What Does “Age Appropriate” Really Mean?

Pat Garner

As we age, I hear the term age appropriate when it comes to just about anything! I hear it relating to fashion, hair and makeup, music preferences, how we should eat, how we should live, and the list goes on.

My question is are we standing in judgment when we see someone wear an item of clothing meant to be worn by someone younger? Is age appropriate a phrase we place upon ourselves as a limiting belief that we can’t do something? Is there a section in Macy’s called Age Appropriate? If there is, I haven’t seen it, have you? I’ll still browse through the junior clothes and just size up since those clothes are cut for a less curvy body.

Will I wear six-inch stiletto heels? The answer would be a big fat NO. But not because I can’t, but rather because I wouldn’t be comfortable. I have my own style somewhere between bohemian and camping chic. Since I “retired” from my 9-5 job I stopped wearing business wear and opted to a more casual on-trend look. The reality is it keeps me feeling vibrant to get dressed and put on some makeup and wear some earrings no matter if anyone sees me or not.

Who decided what’s age appropriate? Are there age appropriate police out there somewhere telling us what we should wear or how we should look? I wonder…it’s like the proverbial “they”.

If you can rock wearing a micro-mini with those stiletto heels, by all means do it! If others see you as not being age appropriate, it’s their problem and not yours. It’s their view of the world through someone else’s ideal of what we should be wearing at a certain age. We’re certainly a product of our upbringing, however, we can change the way we view the world.

As angry as the world seems right now why add to the pressure of society claiming we need to be a certain way. Be who you are and be happy with and accept yourself as you are in this moment. You have no control over the past or future, only the present. Embrace right now.

I vote for removing the term age appropriate from our lexicon.  I mean, wouldn’t it be discrimination for someone to say we need to dress a certain way for our age? I guess that would be ageism. I asked my 25-year-old son his opinion about the term age appropriate and his response was “I don’t care what someone wears or does as long as it doesn’t affect me”. (how millennial of him) I asked him further if an 85-year-old woman wearing stilettos would affect him and his response was…” why would it?” I suppose I raised a smart man.

In the end just be you and love yourself as you are right now and rock that mini and heels!

As we age, I hear the term age appropriate when it comes to just about anything! I hear it relating to fashion, hair and makeup, music preferences, how we should eat, how we should live, and the list goes on.

My question is are we standing in judgment when we see someone wear an item of clothing meant to be worn by someone younger? Is age appropriate a phrase we place upon ourselves as a limiting belief that we can’t do something? Is there a section in Macy’s called Age Appropriate? If there is, I haven’t seen it, have you? I’ll still browse through the junior clothes and just size up since those clothes are cut for a less curvy body.

Will I wear six-inch stiletto heels? The answer would be a big fat NO. But not because I can’t, but rather because I wouldn’t be comfortable. I have my own style somewhere between bohemian and camping chic. Since I “retired” from my 9-5 job I stopped wearing business wear and opted to a more casual on-trend look. The reality is it keeps me feeling vibrant to get dressed and put on some makeup and wear some earrings no matter if anyone sees me or not.

Who decided what’s age appropriate? Are there age appropriate police out there somewhere telling us what we should wear or how we should look? I wonder…it’s like the proverbial “they”.

If you can rock wearing a micro-mini with those stiletto heels, by all means do it! If others see you as not being age appropriate, it’s their problem and not yours. It’s their view of the world through someone else’s ideal of what we should be wearing at a certain age. We’re certainly a product of our upbringing, however, we can change the way we view the world.

As angry as the world seems right now why add to the pressure of society claiming we need to be a certain way. Be who you are and be happy with and accept yourself as you are in this moment. You have no control over the past or future, only the present. Embrace right now.

I vote for removing the term age appropriate from our lexicon.  I mean, wouldn’t it be discrimination for someone to say we need to dress a certain way for our age? I guess that would be ageism. I asked my 25-year-old son his opinion about the term age appropriate and his response was “I don’t care what someone wears or does as long as it doesn’t affect me”. (how millennial of him) I asked him further if an 85-year-old woman wearing stilettos would affect him and his response was…” why would it?” I suppose I raised a smart man.

In the end just be you and love yourself as you are right now and rock that mini and heels! (And I don’t care what my Mom says!)


Pat Garner is a multifaceted coach and health practitioner who has earned the reputation as a dedicated leader and advocate for people to take control of their health. Both driven and equally as dedicated, she is on a mission to awaken people to their infinite potential, so they can pave the path to lasting personal health and success. Ultimately, she strives to be her best version and empowers others to step into their best versions for the greater good of themselves, their community, and the world at large.

During her own journey from addiction over 16 years ago, Pat discovered the world of holistic health and wellness. And is in this discovery where she found her one true calling. Pat  holds certifications as a Nutritional Therapy Practitioner, Professional, Addiction & Recovery, and Wellness Coach, and a Certified Anusara Yoga Instructor. In addition, she is a Sedona Method Facilitator and Certified Canfield Success Principles Trainer. Furthermore, she is well-versed in the Ketogenic and low carb lifestyle.

 

 

 

 

Comments

  1. Mary Lloyd says

    My take: the trick is to dress so that YOU like yourself. Each of us has a huge amount of experience about what works and what doesn’t on the individual body we’re blessed with. The net result should be that we look like who we authentically are in what we wear. Age is irrelevant!

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