November: New Research To Help Live And Feel Better

 Each month there are is so much useful information and this month is no exception.  Please take a look and see if there is something that can make you. or someone you love, feel better.  ******

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Less Is More for Common Cancer Drug, Study Suggests

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110930195141.htm

University of Georgia scientists have found that smaller, less toxic amounts of chemotherapy medicine given frequently to mice with human prostate cancer noticeably slowed tumor growth. The mice suffered fewer side effects compared with traditional cancer treatment relying on heavy doses that can cause hair and bone loss.

How Your Brain Reacts to Mistakes Depends On Your Mindset

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110930153048.htm

“Whether you think you can or think you can’t — you’re right,” said Henry Ford. A new study, to be published in an upcoming issue of Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, finds that people who think they can learn from their mistakes have a different brain reaction to mistakes than people who think intelligence is fixed.

Glucosamine-Like Supplement Suppresses Multiple Sclerosis Attacks, Study Suggests

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110930123057.htm

A glucosamine-like dietary supplement suppresses the damaging autoimmune response seen in multiple sclerosis, according to a UC Irvine study.

Changes in Attention and Visual Perception Are Correlated With Aging: Older People Find It Harder to See the Wood for the Trees

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110725101229.htm

When looking at a picture of many trees, young people will tend to say: “This is a forest.” However, the older we get, the more likely we are to notice a single tree before seeing the forest. This suggests that the speed at which the brain processes the bigger picture is slower in older people. In a new study published in the July-August issue of Elsevier´s Cortex, researchers have found that these age-related changes are correlated with a specific aspect of visual perception, known as Gestalt perception.

Promising Drug Treatment for Improving Language, Social Function in People With Autism

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110929152058.htm

Most drug therapy interventions for people with autism have targeted psychiatric problems, including aggression, anxiety and obsessive behavior. Now, University of Missouri researchers are examining the use of propranolol (a drug used to treat high blood pressure and control heart rate as well as to reduce test anxiety) to improve the primary traits associated with autism — difficulty with normal social skills, language and repetitive behaviors. MU researchers say the drug is a promising new avenue for improving language and social function.

Cocaine Users Have 45 percent Increased Risk of Glaucoma

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110929122934.htm

A study of the 5.3 million men and women seen in Department of Veterans Affairs outpatient clinics in a one-year period found that use of cocaine is predictive of open-angle glaucoma, the most common type of glaucoma.

Oral Steroids Linked to Severe Vitamin D Deficiency in Nationwide US Study

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110929144639.htm

People taking oral steroids are twice as likely as the general population to have severe vitamin D deficiency, according to a study of more than 31,000 children and adults by scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University. Their findings, in the September 28 online edition of The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, suggest that physicians should more diligently monitor vitamin D levels in patients being treated with oral steroids.

Red Wine Ingredient Resveratrol Stops Breast Cancer Growth, Study Suggests

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110929103222.htm

A new research report appearing in the October 2011 issue of The FASEB Journal shows that resveratrol, the “healthy” ingredient in red wine, stops breast cancer cells from growing by blocking the growth effects of estrogen. This discovery, made by a team of American and Italian scientists, suggests for the first time that resveratrol is able to counteract the malignant progression since it inhibits the proliferation of hormone resistant breast cancer cells. This has important implications for the treatment of women with breast cancer whose tumors eventually develop resistance to hormonal therapy.

Commonly Used Supplement May Improve Recovery from Spinal Cord Injuries

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110928185025.htm

A commonly used supplement is likely to improve outcomes and recovery for individuals who sustain a spinal cord injury (SCI), according to research conducted by University of Kentucky neuroscientists.

Popular Colorectal Cancer Drug May Cause Permanent Nerve Damage, Study Suggests

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110928105911.htm

Oxaliplatin, a platinum-based anticancer drug that’s made enormous headway in recent years against colorectal cancer, appears to cause nerve damage that may be permanent and worsens even months after treatment ends. The chemotherapy side effect, described by Johns Hopkins researchers in the September issue of Neurology, was discovered in what is believed to be the first effort to track oxaliplatin-based nerve damage through relatively cheap and easy punch skin biopsies.

‘Belly Fat’ Linked to Development of Asthma, Study Finds

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110925125143.htm

Belly fat, known clinically as central obesity, has been linked to the development of asthma in a new study.

Marijuana Use May Double the Risk of Accidents for Drivers, Study Finds

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111006173453.htm

Over 10 million people age 12 or older are estimated to have driven under the influence of illicit drugs in the prior year, according to a 2009 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. While marijuana is the most commonly detected non-alcohol drug in drivers, its role in causing crashes has remained in question.

Technology to Make Old-Age Safer

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111006084030.htm

A  fall alarm. Automatic nightlight. Oven reminder. Refrigerator alarm. These are just a few of the new welfare technology solutions that may become a normal part of the lives of the elderly in the future.

Lift Weights, Eat Mustard, Build Muscles?

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110929103216.htm

If you are looking to lean out, add muscle mass, and get ripped, a new research report published in The FASEB Journal suggests that you might want to look to your garden for a little help. That’s because scientists have found that when a specific plant steroid was given orally to rats, it triggered a response similar to anabolic steroids, with minimal side effects. In addition, the research found that the stimulatory effect of homobrassinolide (a type of brassinosteroid found in plants such as mustards) on protein synthesis in muscle cells led to increases in lean body mass, muscle mass and physical performance.

This Is Your Brain On Estrogen

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111004123600.htm

It’s no secret that women often gain weight as they get older. The sex hormone estrogen has an important, if underappreciated, role to play in those burgeoning waistlines.

Psychopathic Killers: Computerized Text Analysis Uncovers the Word Patterns of a Predator

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111014145114.htm

As words can be the soul’s window, scientists are learning to peer through it: Computerized text analysis shows that psychopathic killers make identifiable word choices — beyond conscious control — when talking about their crimes.

Gut Bacteria May Affect Whether a Statin Drug Lowers Cholesterol

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111013184815.htm

Statins can be effective at lowering cholesterol, but they have a perplexing tendency to work for some people and not others. Gut bacteria may be the reason.

Smoking Cannabis Increases Risk of Depression in the Case of Genetic Vulnerability, Study Finds

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111010074853.htm

Young people who are genetically vulnerable to depression should be extra careful about using cannabis: smoking cannabis leads to an increased risk of developing depressive symptoms. This has emerged from research carried out by Roy Otten at the Behavioural Science Institute of Radboud University Nijmegen that is published in the online version of the scientific journal Addiction Biology. Two-thirds of the population have the gene variant that makes one sensitive to depression.

Simple Lifestyle Changes Can Add a Decade or More Healthy Years to the Average Lifespan, Canadian Study

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111021074730.htm

Health prevention strategies to help Canadians achieve their optimal health potential could add a decade or more of healthy years to the average lifespan and save the economy billions of dollars as a result of reduced cardiovascular disease, says noted cardiologist Dr. Clyde Yancy.

Women Can Self-Test for HPV, Easily and Accurately, Study Suggests

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111020163909.htm

A team of German researchers has shown that women can accurately test themselves for human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, the most common cause of cervical cancer. The research is published in the October Journal of Clinical Microbiology.

Number of Facebook Friends Linked to Size of Brain Regions, Study Suggests

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111020025650.htm

Scientists funded by the Wellcome Trust have found a direct link between the number of ‘Facebook friends’ a person has and the size of particular brain regions. Researchers at University College London (UCL) also showed that the more Facebook friends a person has, the more ‘real-world’ friends they are likely to have.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids Shown to Prevent or Slow Progression of Osteoarthritis

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111017111600.htm

New research has shown for the first time that omega-3 in fish oil could “substantially and significantly” reduce the signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis.

Profanity in TV and Video Games Linked to Teen Aggression

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111017092231.htm

While it’s been long established that watching violent scenes increases aggression levels, a new study in the medical journal Pediatrics suggests that profanity in the media may have a similar effect. Pediatrics is the top-ranked journal in its field and among the top 2 percent most-cited scientific and medical journals in the world.

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