March 2013 Research to Help Live and Feel Better

Sewage Lagoons Remove Most — But Not All — Pharmaceuticals

2012 marked the 40th anniversary of the Clean Water Act, which established regulations for the discharge of pollutants to waterways and supported the building of sewage treatment plants. Despite these advances, sewage remains a major source of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and naturally occurring hormones found in the environment.

Effective Treatment for Common Gynecological Problem, Suggested by New Study

New research from the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute (LA BioMed) found a progestogen-only treatment halted bleeding in women suffering from extremely heavy periods, according to the study published online by theAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Accelerated Biological Aging, Seen in Women With Alzheimer’s Risk Factor, Blocked by Hormone Therapy

Healthy menopausal women carrying a well-known genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease showed measurable signs of accelerated biological aging, a new study has found.

However, in carriers who started hormone therapy at menopause and remained on that therapy, this acceleration was absent, the researchers said. Hormone therapy for non-carriers of the risk factor, a gene variant called ApoE4, had no protective effect on their biological aging.

Kinect Teleport for Remote Medicine

The Microsoft Kinect game controller could cut the US healthcare bill by up to $30 billion by allowing physicians and other medics to interact with patients remotely so reducing the number of hospital visits and the associated risk of infection, new research suggests.

We’re Emotionally Distant and That’s Just Fine by Me: Closer Relationships Aren’t Necessarily Better Relationships

When it comes to having a lasting and fulfilling relationship, common wisdom says that feeling close to your romantic partner is paramount. But a new study finds that it’s not how close you feel that matters most, it’s whether you are as close as you want to be, even if that’s really not close at all.

Vitamin C Is Beneficial Against the Common Cold, Review Suggests

According to an updated Cochrane Review on vitamin C and the common cold, vitamin C seems to be particularly beneficial for people under heavy physical stress. In five randomized trials of participants with heavy short-term physical stress, vitamin C halved the incidence of the common cold. Three of the trials studied marathon runners, one studied Swiss school children in a skiing camp and one studied Canadian soldiers during a winter exercise. Furthermore, in a recent randomized trial carried out with adolescent competitive swimmers, vitamin C halved the duration of colds in males, although the vitamin had no effect on females.

Risk of Cardiovascular Death Doubled in Women With High Calcium Intake: High Risk Only in Those Taking Supplements as Well

High intakes of calcium (corresponding to diet and supplements) in women are associated with a higher risk of death from all causes, but cardiovascular disease in particular, compared with women with lower calcium intake, a new study suggests.

Platelet-Rich Plasma (Prp) Treatment Shows Potential for Knee Osteoarthritis

A study by researchers from Hospital for Special Surgery has shown that platelet-rich plasma (PRP) holds great promise for treating patients with knee osteoarthritis. The treatment improved pain and function, and in up to 73% of patients, appeared to delay the progression of osteoarthritis, which is a progressive disease. The study appears online, ahead of print, in the Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine.

Making Homemade Guns On a 3-D Printer Becomes Real, So Engineering Expert Suggests Stronger Laws On Gunpowder

With controversy swirling over gun-sale background checks, limiting the size of weapon magazines and retaining Second Amendment rights, the problem of making homemade guns with 3-D printers has become a matter of public concern.

Parents Talking About Their Own Drug Use to Children Could Be Detrimental

Recent research, published in the journal Human Communication Research, found that children whose parents did not disclose drug use, but delivered a strong antidrug message, were more likely to exhibit antidrug attitudes.

Heavy Backpacks May Damage Nerves, Muscles and Skeleton, Study Suggests

Trudging from place to place with heavy weights on our backs is an everyday reality, from schoolchildren toting textbooks in backpacks to firefighters and soldiers carrying occupational gear. Muscle and skeletal damage are very real concerns. Now Tel Aviv University researchers say that nerve damage, specifically to the nerves that travel through the neck and shoulders to animate our hands and fingers, is also a serious risk.

Aspirin and Omega-3 Fatty Acids Work Together to Fight Inflammation

Experts tout the health benefits of low-dose aspirin and omega-3 fatty acids found in foods like flax seeds and salmon, but the detailed mechanisms involved in their effects are not fully known. Now researchers reporting in the February 21 issue of the Cell Press journal Chemistry & Biologyshow that aspirin helps trigger the production of molecules called resolvins that are naturally made by the body from omega-3 fatty acids. These resolvins shut off, or “resolve,” the inflammation that underlies destructive conditions such as inflammatory lung disease, heart disease, and arthritis.

Omega-3s Inhibit Breast Cancer Tumor Growth, Study Finds

A lifelong diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids can inhibit growth of breast cancer tumours by 30 per cent, according to new research from the University of Guelph.

Drugs to Treat Fibromyalgia Just as Likely to Harm as Help, Review Finds

Among fibromyalgia patients taking either of two commonly prescribed drugs to reduce pain, 22 percent report substantial improvement while 21 percent had to quit the regimen due to unpleasant side effects, according to a new review in The Cochrane Library.

Talking About Being Old Is Important Indicator of Body Dissatisfaction

Similar to talking about being fat, talking about being old is an important an indicator of body dissatisfaction, shows research in BioMed Central’s open access journal Journal of Eating Disorders.

Bracelet-Like Device Controls Chronic Acid Reflux

A bracelet-like device with magnetic beads can control the chronic digestive disorder gastroesophageal reflux disease, according to a study published online February 20 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Smoking Cessation in Old Age: Less Heart Attacks and Strokes Within Five Years

Professor Hermann Brenner and colleagues analyzed the data of 8.807 individuals aged between 50 and 74 years using data of Saarland citizens. “We were able to show that the risk of smokers for cardiovascular diseases is more than twice that of non-smokers. However, former smokers are affected at almost the same low rate as people of the same age who never smoked,” says Brenner. “Moreover, smokers are affected at a significantly younger age than individuals who have never smoked or have stopped smoking.”

 

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