Information to Live and Feel Better- July 2014

Green tea could reduce pancreatic cancer risk *** Radiation for prostate cancer linked to secondary cancers *** Can narcissists be moved to show empathy? *** Pleasant smells increase facial attractiveness *** Deception improved athletic performance *** Better to be bullied than ignored in the workplace *** ‘Vocal fry’ hurts women in the labor market *** Cynical? You may be hurting your brain health

Green tea could reduce pancreatic cancer risk

A new study explains how green tea changed the metabolism of pancreatic cancer cells, opening a new area in cancer-fighting research. Green tea and its extracts have beenwidely touted as potential treatments for cancer, as wellas several other diseases. But scientists have struggled toexplain how the green tea and its extracts may work toreduce the risk of cancer or to slow the growth of cancer

Radiation for prostate cancer linked to secondary cancers

Among men treated for prostate cancer, those who received radiation therapy were more likely to develop bladder or rectal cancer, according to a new study. “Overall the incidence of these cancers is low. But when men have received radiation treatments, it’s important to evaluate carefully any symptoms that could be a sign of bladder or rectal cancer,” says the senior study author.

Can narcissists be moved to show empathy?

Researchers have investigated whether narcissists can elicit empathy for another person’s suffering. It has been well documented that narcissists lack empathy, but why is that the case, and do they have the capacity to change that behavior? New research suggests that with the right focus, people with narcissistic tendencies can feel empathy for another person’s suffering.

Girls’ social connections affect math learning

Social connections among African American girls influence their participation and recognition in math class,according to a researcher who found that students who are more socially connected tend to enjoy more access to learning opportunities. Socially peripheral and isolated students had less support, but not all were equally affected. Those who valued social status often participated less, while those who were indifferent to social status participated more and worked alone by choice.

Pleasant smells increase facial attractiveness

Women’s faces are rated as more attractive in the presence of pleasant odors, according to new research. In contrast,odor pleasantness had less effect on age evaluation. The findings suggest that perfumes and scented products may, to some extent, alter how people perceive one another.

Deception improved athletic performance

Researchers say a little deception caused cyclists in their 4K time trial to up their performance even after they realized they had been tricked. The findings support the idea that the brain plays a powerful role in how hard athletes push their bodies.

Better to be bullied than ignored in the workplace

Being ignored at work is worse for physical and mental well-being than harassment or bullying, says a new study. Researchers found that while most consider ostracism less harmful than bullying, feeling excluded is significantly more likely to lead to job dissatisfaction, quitting and health problems. “We’ve been taught that ignoring someone is socially preferable — if you don’t have something nice to say, don’t say anything at all,” says a co-author. “But ostracism actually leads people to feel more helpless, like they’re not worthy of any attention at all.”

‘Vocal fry’ hurts women in the labor market

A form of speech known as vocal fry that is low in pitch and creaky sounding is increasingly common among young American women. A new study indicates that vocal fry is actually perceived negatively, particularly in a labor market context. The study indicates that women who speak in vocal fry are perceived as less attractive, less competent, less educated, less trustworthy, and ultimately less hirable.

Cynical? You may be hurting your brain health

People with high levels of cynical distrust may be more likely to develop dementia, according to a new study.Cynical distrust, which is defined as the belief that others are mainly motivated by selfish concerns, has been associated with other health problems, such as heart disease. This is the first study to look at the relationship between cynicism and dementia.

Drug users switch to heroin because it’s cheap, easy to get

Drug users are attracted to heroin not only for the “high,”but because it is less expensive and easier to get than prescription painkillers, a nationwide survey of heroin users indicate. Researchers have found that many suburban drug users have made the switch. “In the past, heroin was a drug that introduced people to narcotics,” said the principal investigator. “But what we’re seeing now is that most people using heroin begin with prescription painkillers such as OxyContin, Percocet or Vicodin, and only switch to heroin when their prescription drug habits get too expensive.”

Light coaxes stem cells to repair teeth: Noninvasive laser therapy could radically shift dental treatment

Scientists have used low-power light to trigger stem cells inside the body to regenerate tissue. The research lays the foundation for a host of clinical applications in restorative dentistry and regenerative medicine more broadly, such as wound healing, bone regeneration, and more.

Why don’t the highly educated smoke? Families kids grow up in play important role

It’s well established that adults with college degrees are much less likely to smoke than adults with less education, but the reasons for this inequality are unclear. Families in which kids grow up and children’s non-cognitive skills may matter far more than realized in explaining the robust association between education and smoking in adulthood.

FDA approves many drugs that predictably increase heart, stroke risk

The agency charged to protect patients from dangerous drug side effects needs to be more vigilant when it comes tomedications that affect blood pressure. A clinical professor of family medicine has issued this call to the Food and Drug Administration. At issue is the apparent disconnect between what patients and doctors might consider “clinically significant” risk and the standards that some FDA reviewers apply when evaluating the safety of new therapeutics.

Keeping active pays off even in your 70s, 80s

Older people who undertake at least 25 minutes of moderate or vigorous exercise everyday need fewer prescriptions and are less likely to be admitted to hospital in an emergency, new research has revealed. Those in the study who carried out less than 25 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity per day — such as walking quickly, cycling or swimming — received 50 per cent more prescriptions over the following four to five years than those who were more active.

School scheme unable to boost healthy eating, activity among kids

A school-based scheme to encourage children to eat healthily and be active has had little effect, conclude researchers. The findings have relevance for researchers, policy makers, public health practitioners, and doctors, and they suggest that more intense interventions may be required. School based interventions have the potential to reach the vast majority of children, and evidence reviews have suggested some beneficial effect. However, the poor quality of many of the previous trials means their effectiveness may be exaggerated.

Soccer for untrained 70-year-old men yields amazing results

Untrained elderly men get markedly fitter and healthier as a result of playing soccer. After only four months of twice-weekly one-hour training sessions, the men achieved marked improvements in maximum oxygen uptake, muscle function and bone mineralization. The study revealed that inactive elderly men improved their maximum oxygen uptake by 15% and their performance during interval exercise by as much as 50% by playing soccer for 1 hour two times per week over 4 months.

Smokers, passive smokers more likely to suffer hearing loss, study shows

Giving up or reducing smoking and avoiding passive exposure to tobacco smoke may reduce your risk of hearing loss, new research shows. Current smokers have a 15.1% higher odds of hearing loss than non-smokers researchers found. Passive smoking also increased the likelihood of hearing loss by 28%.

Sleep apnea tied to diabetes in large study

In the largest study to date of the relationship between sleep apnea and diabetes, a new study of more than 8,500 patients has demonstrated a link between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and the development of diabetes, confirming earlier evidence of such a relationship from smaller studies with shorter follow-up periods.

Why are older women more vulnerable to breast cancer? New clues

More insights into why older women are more susceptible to breast cancer has been gained by researchers. They found that as women age, the cells responsible for maintaining healthy breast tissue stop responding to their immediate surroundings, including mechanical cues that should prompt them to suppress nearby tumors.

Research on marijuana’s negative health effects summarized in report

The current state of science on the adverse health effects of marijuana use links the drug to several significant adverse effects including addiction, a review reports. The review describes the science establishing that marijuana can be addictive and that this risk for addiction increases for daily or young users. It also offers insights into research on the gateway theory indicating that marijuana use, similar to nicotine and alcohol use, may be associated with an increased vulnerability to other drugs.

Sperm size, shape in young men affected by cannabis use

Young men who use cannabis may be putting their fertility at risk by inadvertently affecting the size and shape of their sperm, according to new research. In the world’s largest study to investigate how common lifestyle factors influence the size and shape of sperm, a research team found that sperm size and shape was worse in samples ejaculated in the summer months, but was better in men who had abstained from sexual activity for more than six days.

How high blood pressure in middle age may affect memory in old age

High blood pressure in middle age plays a critical role in whether blood pressure in old age may affect memory and thinking, research shows. The study found that the association of blood pressure in old age to brain measures depended on a history of blood pressure in middle age. Higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure were associated with increased risk of brain lesions and tiny brain bleeds. This was most noticeable in people without a history of high blood pressure in middle age.

Poor health, lifestyle factors linked to memory complaints, even among younger adults

Researchers polled more than 18,000 people about their memory and a variety of lifestyle and health factors previously shown to increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. They found that many of these risk factors increased the likelihood of self-perceived memory complaints across all adult age groups. The findings may help scientists better identify how early lifestyle and health choices impact memory later in life.

Processed red meat linked to higher risk of heart failure, death in men

Men who regularly eat moderate amounts of processed red meat such as cold cuts (ham/salami) and sausage may have an increased risk of heart failure incidence and a greater risk of death from heart failure. Researchers recommend avoiding processed red meat and limiting the amount of unprocessed red meat to one to two servings a week or less.

Watching too much TV may increase risk of early death: Three hours a day linked to premature death from any cause

Adults who watch TV three hours or more a day may double their risk of premature death from any cause. Researchers suggest adults should consider getting regular exercise, avoiding long sedentary periods and reducing TV viewing to one to two hours a day.

New method increases targeted bone volume by 30 percent

In an important development for the health of elderly people, researchers have developed a new method to target bone growth. As people age their bones lose density and, especially in women after the menopause, become more brittle. The new method developed offers the possibility of more effective treatment than currently available.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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