Information to Help Live and Feel Better – December

***Exercise Programs Could Help to Prevent Fall Injuries in Elderly***Are food supplements being over-subscribed in UK hospitals? ‘No,’ says government***Flawed Testosterone Analysis Spurs Misleading Media Headlines***Can Certain Herbs Stave Off Alzheimer’s Disease?***No Hot Flashes? Then Don’t Count On Hormones to Improve Quality of Life***Natural Compound Mitigates Effects of Methamphetamine Abuse***Regular Physical Activity in Later Life Boosts Likelihood of ‘Healthy Aging’ Up to Sevenfold***Hysterectomized Women May Benefit from Testosterone

  

Babies Can Learn Their First Lullabies in the Womb 

An infant can recognise a lullaby heard in the womb for several months after birth, potentially supporting later speech development. This is indicated in a new study at the University of Helsinki. 

Exercise Programs Could Help to Prevent Fall Injuries in Elderly 

Exercise programs designed to prevent falls in older adults also appear to prevent injuries caused by falls, suggests a new paper. 

Are food supplements being over-subscribed in UK hospitals? ‘No,’ says government 

.The UK hospital system spends more on food supplements and medical food than it does on regular food, a situation that has provoked protest today – but the government says it is based on genuine need. 

Flawed Testosterone Analysis Spurs Misleading Media Headlines 

The precipitous decline of men’s testosterone levels over the years is inevitable. Unless aging men replace their diminishing testosterone, they could succumb to any of the numerous health problems linked to low testosterone levels: frailty, muscle loss, weight gain, impaired cognition, fatigue, loss of self-confidence, depression, declining bone health, increased risk of type 2 diabetes, stroke, and cardiovascular disease. 

Bio Patch That Can Regrow Bone 

Researchers at the University of Iowa have created a bio patch to regenerate missing or damaged bone by putting DNA into a nano-sized particle that delivers bone-producing instructions directly into cells. 

Can Certain Herbs Stave Off Alzheimer’s Disease? 

Enhanced extracts made from special antioxidants in spearmint and rosemary improve learning and memory, a study in an animal model at Saint LouisUniversity found. 

Late Afternoon, Early Evening Caffeine Can Disrupt Sleep at Night 

A new study shows that caffeine consumption even six hours before bedtime can have significant, disruptive effects on sleep. 

No Hot Flashes? Then Don’t Count On Hormones to Improve Quality of Life 

Hormones at menopause can help with sleep, memory, and more, but only when a woman also has hot flashes, find researchers at HelsinkiUniversity in Finland. Their study was published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). 

Contraceptive pill ‘doubles risk of leading cause of blindness’ 

Long-term use of the contraceptive pill doubles the risk of a leading cause of blindness, a study has shown. Scientists warned that the Pill may play a role in glaucoma and urged women at risk to have their eyes screened. 

Natural Compound Mitigates Effects of Methamphetamine Abuse 

Studies have shown that resveratrol, a natural compound found in colored vegetables, fruits and especially grapes, may minimize the impact of Parkinson’s disease, stroke and Alzheimer’s disease in those who maintain healthy diets or who regularly take resveratrol supplements. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have found that resveratrol may also block the effects of the highly addictive drug, methamphetamine. 

Hysterectomized Women May Benefit from Testosterone 

Hysterectomy and oophorectomy (the removal of ovaries) are performed to treat various diseases in women, including cancer. These procedures are accompanied not only by a decline in estrogen but also testosterone levels in the blood. Many women who have undergone surgical removal of their uterus and/or ovaries can develop symptoms of sexual dysfunction, fatigue, low mood and decreased muscle mass. 

Regular Physical Activity in Later Life Boosts Likelihood of ‘Healthy Aging’ Up to Sevenfold 

It’s never too late to get physically active, with even those starting relatively late in life reaping significant health benefits, finds research published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

 

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