Good Stuff To Know September 2016

Highlights

A minute of secondhand marijuana smoke may damage blood vessels: Study in rats * * * Resveratrol appears to restore blood-brain barrier integrity in Alzheimer’s disease * * * Faces aren’t always to be believed when it comes to honesty * * * All e-cigarettes emit harmful chemicals, but some emit more than others * * * Adolescent exposure to drugs, alcohol fuels use in adulthood * * * Modern-day slavery at Thai poultry farms risks ‘polluting’ supply chain * * * Study suggests ‘use it or lose it’ to defend against memory loss * * * Brains of overweight people ‘ten years older’ than lean counterparts at middle-age * * * Assisted-living facilities limit older adults’ rights to sexual freedom, study finds * * * Working, volunteering could reduce disablement in seniors, study finds * * * Replacing just one sugary drink with water could significantly improve health * * * Beginning pornography use associated with increase in probability of divorce * * * Western diet increases Alzheimer’s risk * * * 

 

good stuff to know this monthA minute of secondhand marijuana smoke may damage blood vessels: Study in rats

Rats’ blood vessels took at least three times longer to recover function after only a minute of breathing secondhand marijuana smoke, compared to recovery after a minute of breathing secondhand tobacco smoke. With many states legalizing medical and recreational marijuana, and possible corporate expansion within the cannabis industry, this type of research is important to help understand the health consequences of exposure to secondhand marijuana smoke, researchers said.

Resveratrol appears to restore blood-brain barrier integrity in Alzheimer’s disease

Resveratrol, given to Alzheimer’s patients, appears to restore the integrity of the blood-brain barrier, reducing the ability of harmful immune molecules secreted by immune cells to infiltrate from the body into brain tissues, say researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center. The reduction in neuronal inflammation slowed the cognitive decline of patients, compared to a matching group of placebo-treated patients with the disorder.

Faces aren’t always to be believed when it comes to honesty

Researchers have determined that certain facial features, not the expression, influence whether people think someone is trustworthy. Two studies have determined that people often make judgments of trustworthiness based solely on the face.

All e-cigarettes emit harmful chemicals, but some emit more than others

While previous studies have found that electronic cigarettes emit toxic compounds, a new study has pinpointed the source of these emissions and shown how factors such as the temperature, type, and age of the device play a role in emission levels, information that could be valuable to both manufacturers and regulators seeking to minimize the health impacts of these increasingly popular devices.

Adolescent exposure to drugs, alcohol fuels use in adulthood

Teenagers who have easy access to drugs and alcohol in the home are more likely to drink and do drugs in their early and late 20s. That’s according to the one of the first studies to look at how adolescent exposure to illegal substances affects patterns of abuse in adulthood.

Modern-day slavery at Thai poultry farms risks ‘polluting’ supply chain

Poultry meat importers risk “polluting their supply chains” by relying on Thai producers that abuse workers’ rights and must press them to uphold the law, according to a prominent migrant rights activist.

Study suggests ‘use it or lose it’ to defend against memory loss

Researchers have identified a protein essential for building memories that appears to predict the progression of memory loss and brain atrophy in Alzheimer’s patients. Their findings suggest there is a link between brain activity and the presence of this protein. “The discovery is encouraging as it offers an avenue to track the progression of Alzheimer’s disease over time, but it also generates a lot of questions. Researchers want to know how best to boost NPTX2 levels and if there is an added benefit. They were struck by a trend in the data that points to a possible answer. Study participants with more years of education showed higher levels of the protein. Willette says people with complex jobs or who stay mentally and socially active could see similar benefits, supporting the notion of “use it or lose it.”

“You’re keeping the machinery going,” Willette said. “It makes sense that the more time spent intensely focused on learning, the more your brain is trained to process information and that doesn’t go away. That intense kind of learning seems to make your brain stronger.”

Brains of overweight people ‘ten years older’ than lean counterparts at middle-age

From middle-age, the brains of obese individuals display differences in white matter similar to those in lean individuals ten years their senior, according to new research led by the University of Cambridge. White matter is the tissue that connects areas of the brain and allows for information to be communicated between regions.

Assisted-living facilities limit older adults’ rights to sexual freedom, study finds

Older adults in assisted-living facilities experience limits to their rights to sexual freedom because of a lack of policies regarding the issue and the actions of staff and administrators at these facilities, according to research.

Working, volunteering could reduce disablement in seniors, study finds

Working or volunteering can reduce the chances of chronic health conditions leading to physical disability in older Americans, according to researchers at Georgia State University and Florida State University.

Replacing just one sugary drink with water could significantly improve health

New study findings modeled the effect of replacing one 8-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage with an 8-ounce serving of water, based on the daily dietary intake of US adults aged 19 and older, retrieved from the 2007-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys.

Beginning pornography use associated with increase in probability of divorce

Beginning pornography use is associated with a substantial increase in the probability of divorce for married Americans, and this increase is especially large for women, finds a new study that will be presented at the 111th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA).

Western diet increases Alzheimer’s risk

Globally, about 42 million people now have dementia, with Alzheimer’s disease as the most common type of dementia. Rates of Alzheimer’s disease are rising worldwide. The most important risk factors seem to be linked to diet, especially the consumption of meat, sweets, and high-fat dairy products that characterize a Western Diet. The evidence of these risk factors, which come from ecological and observational studies, also shows that fruits, vegetables, grains, low-fat dairy products, legumes, and fish are associated with reduced risk.

 

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