Good Stuff To Know July 2017

 

 * * * Highlights * * * 

  • Low-dose THC can relieve stress; more does just the opposite * * * STD treatment for two? * * * Timing meals later at night can cause weight gain and impair fat metabolism * * * Heroin’s use rising, costing society more than $51 billion * * * Teen cannabis use and illicit drug use in early adulthood linked * * * Poor diet, plus Alzheimer’s gene, may fuel disease * * * Marijuana use among college students on rise following Oregon legalization, study finds * * * Loss of estrogen a risk factor for disc degeneration and lower back pain * * * Long-term daily aspirin use linked to higher than expected risk of bleeding in adults aged 75 or over * * * 19-year-olds as sedentary as 60-year-olds, study suggests * * * Rates of marijuana use, heavy use, and cannabis use disorder depend on where you live * * * Paradox of pills: Tablet ‘overload’ may be causing harm and putting lives at risk, warn researchers * * * Alzheimer’s disease study links brain health, physical activity * * * Adulthood well-being lower for single-parent kids * * * The mere presence of your smartphone reduces brain power, study shows * * * Fungal toxins easily become airborne, creating potential indoor health risk.

 

Low-dose THC can relieve stress; more does just the opposite

Low levels tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, the main psychoactive compound in marijuana, does reduce stress, but in a highly dose-dependent manner, new research confirms.

STD treatment for two?

In some states, patients who test positive for chlamydia or gonorrhea leave the clinic with not only a prescription for themselves, but also one for their sexual partner — who was not seen by a doctor. States that allow doctors to treat a patient’s sexual partner without an in-person visit may find more success lowering rates of sexually transmitted diseases, shows a new report.

Timing meals later at night can cause weight gain and impair fat metabolism

New findings suggest eating late at night could be more dangerous than you think. Compared to eating earlier in the day, prolonged delayed eating can increase weight, insulin and cholesterol levels, and negatively affect fat metabolism, and hormonal markers implicated in heart disease, diabetes and other health problems, according to recent results.

Heroin’s use rising, costing society more than $51 billion

Heroin use in the United States was estimated to cost society more than $51 billion in 2015, according to new research at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Why the marijuana and tobacco policy camps are on very different paths

New research looked at diverging trajectories of cannabis and tobacco policies in the US and attempts to explain some of the reasoning behind the different paths, while discussing possible implications.

Teen cannabis use and illicit drug use in early adulthood linked

Researchers have found regular and occasional cannabis use as a teen is associated with a greater risk of other illicit drug taking in early adulthood. The study also found cannabis use was associated with harmful drinking and smoking.

Single dual time-point PET scan identifies dual Alzheimer’s biomarkers

Identifying Alzheimer’s disease before major symptoms arise is critical to preserving brain function and helping patients maintain quality of life. A new study demonstrates that a single dual time-point PET scan could identify important biomarkers of the disease.

Emphasizing individual solutions to big issues can reduce support for government efforts

Experiments suggest that making individuals aware of how they can help solve large-scale problems makes them less likely to support government-based solutions.

Poor diet, plus Alzheimer’s gene, may fuel disease

A diet high in cholesterol, fat and sugar may influence the development of Alzheimer’s disease in people who carry the ApoE4 gene, a leading risk factor for the memory-erasing disease, indicates a new USC study.

Marijuana use among college students on rise following Oregon legalization, study finds

College students attending an Oregon university are using more marijuana now that the drug is legal for recreational use, but the increase is largely among students who also report recent heavy use of alcohol, a new study has found.

Loss of estrogen a risk factor for disc degeneration and lower back pain

New study links menopause to lumbar disc degeneration and suggests benefits of hormone therapy.

Long-term daily aspirin use linked to higher than expected risk of bleeding in adults aged 75 or over

In people aged 75 or over, long-term daily aspirin use is linked to a higher than expected risk of disabling or fatal bleeding, according to a new study. Proton-pump inhibitors should be co-prescribed for adults in this age group to reduce the risk of bleeds, warn researchers.

19-year-olds as sedentary as 60-year-olds, study suggests

Physical activity among children and teens is lower than previously thought, and, in another surprise finding, young adults after the age of 20 show the only increases in activity over the lifespan, suggests a study conducted by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. And, the study found, starting at age 35, activity levels declined through midlife and older adulthood.

Rates of marijuana use, heavy use, and cannabis use disorder depend on where you live

Adult marijuana use rose significantly in states that passed loosely regulated medical marijuana laws (MMLs) according to a new study. The highest increases were reported among adults ages 26 and over. Little change was found in past-month marijuana use among adolescents or young adults between the ages 18 and 25.

Interventions to prevent cognitive decline, dementia

Cognitive training, blood pressure management for people with hypertension, and increased physical activity all show modest but inconclusive evidence that they can help prevent cognitive decline and dementia, but there is insufficient evidence to support a public health campaign encouraging their adoption, says a new report.

Paradox of pills: Tablet ‘overload’ may be causing harm and putting lives at risk, warn researchers

Around three million people take multiple medicines, but no reliable systems exist to help patients and carers manage their pills. When medication management goes wrong, particularly with older people, the effect can be dreadful for everyone involved. A novel study linking the experiences of patients, carers and practitioners with a review of the scientific evidence, aims to find ways to improve medication management and the quality of life of older people and their carers.

Alzheimer’s disease study links brain health, physical activity

People at risk for Alzheimer’s disease who do more moderate-intensity physical activity, but not light-intensity physical activity, are more likely to have healthy patterns of glucose metabolism in their brain, according to a new study.

Adulthood wellbeing lower for single-parent kids

People who grew up in single-parent families have lower levels of wellbeing and life satisfaction in adulthood, according to new research.

New measures of aging may show 70 is the new 60

A new study uses new measures of aging to scientifically illustrate that one’s actual age is not necessarily the best measure of human aging itself, particularly in relation to population aging.

The mere presence of your smartphone reduces brain power, study shows

Your cognitive capacity is significantly reduced when your smartphone is within reach — even if it’s off — suggests new research.

Fungal toxins easily become airborne, creating potential indoor health risk

Toxins produced by three different species of fungus growing indoors on wallpaper may become aerosolized, and easily inhaled. The findings likely have implications for ‘sick building syndrome.

 

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