Good Stuff To Know January 2017

! ! ! Highlights ! ! ! 

When judging other people, first impressions last * * * Does Parkinson’s start in the gut? Study reinforces gut-brain link * * * Psychological well-being and physical activity in older adults * * * Re-emergence of syphilis traced to pandemic strain cluster * * * Baby boomers on dope: Recreational marijuana use is on the rise among adults over 50 * * * Baby boomers in worse health than their parents * * * A handful of nuts a day cuts the risk of a wide range of diseases * * * Groundbreaking Research That May Make Aging Obsolete * * * Beware: Children can passively ‘smoke’ marijuana, too * * * Running actually lowers inflammation in knee joints, may also slow the process that leads to osteoarthritis

When judging other people, first impressions last

A well-known saying urges people to “not judge a book by its cover.” But people tend to do just that — even after they’ve skimmed a chapter or two, according to Cornell University research.

Does Parkinson’s start in the gut? Study reinforces gut-brain link

Parkinson’s disease may be triggered by gut microbes, according to a California Institute of Technology (Caltech) study that points to probiotics as a potential therapy for the disease.

Gut microbes promote motor deficits in a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease

Gut microbes may play a critical role in the development of Parkinson’s-like movement disorders in genetically predisposed mice, researchers report. Antibiotic treatment reduced motor deficits and molecular hallmarks of Parkinson’s disease in a mouse model, whereas transplantation of gut microbes from patients with Parkinson’s disease exacerbated symptoms in these mice. The findings could lead to new treatment strategies for the second most common neurodegenerative disease in the United States.

Psychological well-being and physical activity in older adults

In a paper just published by researchers at Chapman University, findings showed associations between psychological well-being and physical activity in adults ages 50 and older.

Re-emergence of syphilis traced to pandemic strain cluster

Over the last few decades, an age-old infectious disease has been re-emerging globally: Syphilis. Using techniques to analyze low levels of DNA, an international research team headed by the University of Zurich has now shown that all syphilis strains from modern patient samples share a common ancestor from the 1700s. Furthermore, their research demonstrates that strains dominating infections today originate from a pandemic cluster that emerged after 1950, and these strains share a worrying trait: Resistance to the second-line antibiotic azithromycin.

Baby boomers on dope: Recreational marijuana use is on the rise among adults over 50

There is a common misperception that widespread marijuana use is limited to younger generations. However, the Baby Boomer generation has reported higher rates of substance use than any preceding generation.

Baby boomers in worse health than their parents

Despite having a reputation of being the healthiest and most active generation, baby boomers are actually in worse overall health than their parents, according to a new study.

A handful of nuts a day cuts the risk of a wide range of diseases

A large analysis of current research shows that people who eat at least 20g of nuts a day have a lower risk of heart disease, cancer and other diseases.

Groundbreaking Research That May Make Aging Obsolete

Researchers are on the verge of cracking the aging code, and death caused by aging may become obsolete by as early as 2033. A synergy between two ground-breaking research fields is predicted to not only keep us alive; but to also keep us vivacious, youthful and healthy.

Beware: Children can passively ‘smoke’ marijuana, too

Relaxing with a joint around children is not very wise. Not only do youngsters inhale harmful secondary smoke in the process, but the psychoactive chemicals in the drug are taken up by their bodies as well.

Lending a hand: Student 3D prints functional, affordable prosthetic

A physics student adapted open source plans for a prosthetic hand to build a highly functional, affordable prosthetic, outlines a new report.

Running actually lowers inflammation in knee joints, may also slow the process that leads to osteoarthritis

We all know that running causes a bit of inflammation and soreness, and that’s just the price you pay for cardiovascular health. You know; no pain, no gain. Well, maybe not. New research from exercise science professors finds that pro-inflammatory molecules actually go down in the knee joint after running.

Feeling grateful? No, thanks New research reveals autonomous individuals dislike gratitude, explores connection to interpersonal relationships

Not everyone experiences gratitude in response to the generosity of others. This could have to do with an autonomous personal style. There’s nothing wrong with autonomy. But to what extent could autonomy interfere with how gratitude helps relationships?

Celebrity chefs have poor food safety practices

Celebrity chefs are cooking up poor food safety habits, according to a Kansas State University study.

Avoiding over-the-counter heartburn medications could save cancer patients’ lives: Medications for heartburn, gastric issues could lower possibility of survival and recovery for cancer patients

Something as seemingly harmless as a heartburn pill could lead cancer patients to take a turn for the worse. A new study has discovered that proton pump inhibitors, which are very common medications for heartburn and gastrointestinal bleeding, decrease effects of capecitabine, a type of chemotherapy usually prescribed to gastric cancer patients.

Why popular antacids may increase chance of bone fractures

Newly research details a discovery explaining why the 100 million Americans estimated to be taking prescription and over-the-counter antacid and heartburn medications may be at an increased risk of bone fractures.

Helping pays off: People who care for others live longer

Older people who help and support others live longer, a new study has concluded. The results of these findings show that this kind of caregiving can have a positive effect on the mortality of the carers.