Good Stuff To Know August 2016

* * * Highlights * * * 

Many elderly are prescribed antihypertensive medication despite already having low blood pressure *** Are we giving up on cardiac arrest patients too soon? *** UTSA researcher develops new, non-invasive method to wipe out cancerous tumors *** Alzheimer’s detected before symptoms via new eye technology *** Infants prefer toys typed to their gender, says study *** Nearly a third of Hispanics in Texas don’t have health insurance *** New link between periodontal and cerebrovascular diseases *** Diseases that run in families not all down to genes, study shows *** Physical declines begin earlier than expected among U.S. adults *** Why baby boomers need a hepatitis C screening

 

good stuff to know this monthAre we giving up on cardiac arrest patients too soon?

University of Arizona study suggests physicians need to give comatose cardiac arrest survivors adequate time before predicting outcomes. The multicenter study showed the time it takes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients to regain consciousness varies widely and is longer than many had thought. Thousands of lives each year across the country could be saved by simply giving cardiac arrest victims more time to awaken in the hospital.

Many elderly are prescribed antihypertensive medication despite already having low blood pressure

A significant proportion of patients over 70 remain on antihypertensive medication despite having low blood pressure, new research reveals. This, the study argues, has a significant effect on increased mortality rates and admissions to hospital.

Living longer associated with living healthier, study of centenarians finds

Research has shown that the human lifespan has the potential to be extended. But would this merely mean people living longer in poor health? The upbeat findings from a new study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society indicate that those extra years could well be healthy ones. In a study of nearly 3,000 people, the onset of illness came decades later in life for centenarians than for their younger counterparts.

UTSA researcher develops new, non-invasive method to wipe out cancerous tumors

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-06/uota-urd062716.php

Matthew Gdovin, an associate professor in the UTSA Department of Biology, has developed a newly patented method to kill cancer cells. His discovery, described in a new study in The Journal of Clinical Oncology, may tremendously help people with inoperable or hard-to-reach tumors, as well as young children stricken with cancer.

Alzheimer’s detected before symptoms via new eye technology

Scientists may have overcome a major roadblock in the development of Alzheimer’s therapies by creating a new technology to observe in the back of the eye progression of the disease before the onset of symptoms. Clinical trials are starting soon to test the technology in humans, according to a new paper.

Infants prefer toys typed to their gender, says study

Children as young as 9 months-old prefer to play with toys specific to their own gender, according to a new study. The research suggests the possibility that boys and girls follow different developmental trajectories with respect to selection of gender-typed toys and that there is both a biological and a developmental-environmental components to the sex differences seen in object preferences.

Nearly a third of Hispanics in Texas don’t have health insurance

The percentage of Hispanics in Texas without health insurance has dropped by 30 percent since the Affordable Care Act went into effect, but almost one-third of Hispanic Texans ages 18 to 64 remain uninsured, shows a new report.

New link between periodontal and cerebrovascular diseases

A new study has revealed a relationship between chronic periodontitis and lacunar infarct, two common diseases in the elderly. Chronic periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of the gums, whereas lacunar infarct is a type of cerebral small vessel disease that can lead to a stroke.

Come on baby, (re)light my fire

Many couples find that their sexual desire has dwindled over time. It’s not unusual for partners who could not keep their hands off each to gradually lose interest. But new research indicates that there are ways that couples can sustain — or relight — their passion.

Diseases that run in families not all down to genes, study shows

Family history of disease may be as much the result of shared lifestyle and surroundings as inherited genes, research has shown. Factors that are common to the family environment — such as shared living space and common eating habits — can make a major contribution to a person’s risk of disease, the study found.

Physical declines begin earlier than expected among U.S. adults

Physical declines begin sooner in life than typically detected, often when people are still in their 50s, according to a Duke Health study that focused on a large group of U.S. adults across a variety of age groups.

Why baby boomers need a hepatitis C screening

Baby boomers, adults born between 1945 and 1965, are five times more likely to have been exposed to the hepatitis C virus (HCV).

 

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