Good Stuff To Know August, 2015

SSRI antidepressants taken for menopausal symptoms may boost bone fracture risk *** Sugary drinks linked to high death tolls worldwide *** Marijuana users substitute alcohol at 21 *** Smartphones may be detrimental to learning process *** High-pressure oxygen can effectively treat fibromyalgia *** Exercise can improve brain function in older adults *** Attention beach goers: Fecal contamination affects sand more than water *** Potential treatment for Parkinson’s disease discovered *** Blood vessels can actually get better with age *** Buyer beware: dental implants prone to fracture

 

Good Stuff To Know

Good Stuff To Know

SSRI antidepressants taken for menopausal symptoms may boost bone fracture risk

The class of antidepressants known as SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors), taken to curb menopausal symptoms, may boost bone fracture risk, suggests research published online in the journal Injury Prevention.

Sugary drinks linked to high death tolls worldwide

Consumption of sugary drinks may lead to an estimated 184,000 adult deaths each year worldwide, according to research. In the first detailed global report on the impact of sugar-sweetened beverages, researchers estimated deaths and disabilities from diabetes, heart disease, and cancers in 2010. In this analysis, sugar sweetened beverages were defined as any sugar-sweetened sodas, fruit drinks, sports/energy drinks, sweetened iced teas, or homemade sugary drinks such as frescas, that contained at least 50 kcal per 8oz serving. 100 percent fruit juice was excluded.

Most plastic surgeons now use fat grafting as part of facelift surgery

In recent years, a large majority of US plastic surgeons have adopted fat grafting techniques as part of their approach to facelift surgery, reports a study. Fat grafting—transferring small amounts of the patient’s own fat in strategic areas—has become a common technique utilized by most surgeons today performing facial rejuvenation, researchers report.

Marijuana users substitute alcohol at 21

A recent study looked at marijuana and alcohol use in people between the ages of 18 and 24. It’s probably not surprising that the results show a drastic increase in alcohol consumption in people just over 21; after all, that’s the minimum legal age to drink. What an economist-researcher found remarkable is that, at the same age, there was an equally dramatic drop in marijuana use.

Smartphones may be detrimental to learning process

A yearlong study of first-time smartphone users has found that users felt smartphones were actually detrimental to their ability to learn. The research reveals the self-rated impact of smartphones among the users.

High-pressure oxygen can effectively treat fibromyalgia

Women with fibromyalgia, a chronic pain syndrome, were able to drastically reduce, or even eliminate, their use of pain medication following hyperbaric oxygen treatment, according to new research.. The researchers also believe they have identified the primary factor causing fibromyalgia: the disruption of the brain mechanism for processing pain.

Treating more adults with statins would be cost-effective way to boost heart health

A new study has found that it would be cost-effective to treat 48-67 percent of all adults aged 40-75 in the US with cholesterol-lowering statins. By expanding the current recommended treatment guidelines and boosting the percentage of adults taking statins, an additional 161,560 cardiovascular-related events could be averted, according to the researchers.

Links found between blood type and risk of cognitive decline

A pioneering study conducted by leading researchers at the University of Sheffield has revealed blood types play a role in the development of the nervous system and may cause a higher risk of developing cognitive decline. The research, carried out in collaboration with the IRCCS San Camillo Hospital Foundation in Venice, shows that people with an ‘O’ blood type have more grey matter in their brain, which helps to protect against diseases such as Alzheimer’s, than those with ‘A’, ‘B’ or ‘AB’ blood types.

Exercise can improve brain function in older adults

Older adults can improve brain function by raising their fitness level, new research suggests. The research indicated that the intensity of the exercise appeared to matter more than the duration.

Attention beachgoers: Fecal contamination affects sand more than water

‘No swimming’ signs have already popped up this summer along coastlines where fecal bacteria have invaded otherwise inviting waters. Some vacationers ignore the signs while others resign themselves to tanning and playing on the beach. But should those avoiding the water be wary of the sand, too? New research investigates reasons why the answer could be ‘yes.’

Your phone knows if you’re depressed

Depression can be detected from your smartphone sensor data by tracking the number of minutes you use the phone and your daily geographical locations, reports a new study. The more time you spend using your phone, the more likely you are depressed. Spending most of your time at home and most of your time in fewer locations also are linked to depression. The research could lead to monitoring people at risk of depression and enabling health care providers to intervene.

Exercising 300 minutes per week better for reducing total fat in postmenopausal women

Postmenopausal women who exercised 300 minutes per week were better at reducing total fat and other adiposity measures, especially obese women, during a one-year clinical trial, a noteworthy finding because body fat has been associated with increased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer, according to a recent article.

It’s official: Workplace rudeness is contagious

Rudeness in the workplace isn’t just unpleasant: it’s also contagious. Encountering rude behavior at work makes people more likely to perceive rudeness in later interactions, a study shows. That perception makes them more likely to be impolite in return, spreading rudeness like a virus.

Potential treatment for Parkinson’s disease discovered

Scientists have found that existing anti-malaria drugs could be a potential treatment for Parkinson’s disease. Parkinson’s disease is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system that causes a person to lose control of motor movements, such as the ability to move his or her hands, arms, and legs.

Blood vessels can actually get better with age

Oxidative stress has been linked to cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases including diabetes, hypertension and age-related cancers. However, researchers recently found that aging actually offered significant protection against oxidative stress. These findings suggest that aging may trigger an adaptive response to counteract the effects of oxidative stress on blood vessels.

Buyer beware: dental implants prone to fracture

An examination of 100 discarded dental implants under a scanning electron microscope found that more than 60 percent of them had cracks and other flaws that made them prone to fracturing. More than 3 million people in the U.S. alone have dental implants.

 

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